CalCOFI Conference 2022

Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management

December 5th - 7th, 2022

Location: Scripps Institution of Oceanography
UCSD, San Diego, CA
in person with a hybrid option available

Hosted By:
Scripps Institution of Oceanography

In Association With:
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Southwest Fisheries Science Center

For conference inquiries,
please email Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI Coordinator

Overview

Please join us for this year’s CalCOFI Conference 2022, Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management, which will be held at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, CA, from December 5th – 7th, 2022. The conference will happen in-person with a remote option and will consist of keynotes, panels, contributed talks, posters, and workshops related to innovations in data collection, analysis, and applications of time series data, as well as understanding the State of the California Current.

Conference Description

Please join us for this year’s CalCOFI Conference 2022, Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management, which will be held at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, CA, from December 5th – 7th, 2022. The conference will happen in-person with a remote option and will consist of keynotes, panels, contributed talks, posters, and workshops related to innovations in data collection, analysis, and applications of time series data, as well as understanding the State of the California Current.

Methodological innovations in the collection, use, and application of ocean ecosystem data are needed to meet the challenge of evaluating the current state and predicting future conditions of rapidly changing marine ecosystems.  The goal of the CalCOFI Conference 2022, Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management, is to explore and refine data collection, processing, techniques, analysis, and serving tools used to support the management of marine resources, including fisheries, energy, aquaculture, sanctuaries, cultural heritage, and climate mitigation and adaptation.

We invite speakers to explore ways to apply non-traditional data to fisheries assessments, renewable energy & aquaculture siting, cultural heritage, and other marine management applications. This could include utilizing existing data in new and emerging spatiotemporal statistical modeling methods, including predictive ecological modeling. We also invite presenters to share new technologies that could augment the utility of existing long-term sampling techniques, such as through innovations in sampling platforms and methods (e.g., uncrewed systems, aerosol sampling, participatory monitoring); biodiversity sensor technologies (e.g., Imaging FlowCytobot, CytoBuoy, Video Plankton Recorder, and passive/active acoustic sensors); and novel forms of data collection (e.g, environmental DNA, chemical tracers, and larval fish otolith analysis).

In addition, we welcome submissions that provide insight into the structure, functioning, and dynamics of the California Current Ecosystem and other Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems, including the biophysical and human dimensions.

The conference will consist of keynotes, panels, contributed talks, posters, and a workshop related to innovations in data collection, analysis, and applications of time series data as well as understanding the State of the California Current

Conference Agenda

Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management

December 4th, 2022

         7:00pm - 8:30pm - Pre-conference casual meetup at La Jolla Shores Hotel Restaurant (No Host)

December 5th, 2022

State of the California Current Ecosystem

8:30am - 9:00am - Welcome Ceremony & Opening of the Conference (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Brice Semmens, CalCOFI Director, SIO

Margaret Leinen, Director of SIO

Moderator: Brice Semmens, CalCOFI Director, SIO

9:00am - 10:00am - State of the California Current Ecosystem & State of the Fisheries Report (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Andrew Thompson, Research Fisheries Biologist, SWFSC

Rasmus Swalethorp, Research Fisheries Biologist, SWFSC

Julia Coates, CalCOFI Program Lead, CDFW

Moderator: Ed Weber, SWFSC

10:00am – 10:30am - Morning Coffee/Tea Break (Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

10:30am - 11:30am - Observations from Sea-going Professionals: Panel & Discussion (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Joe Cacciola, Captain Sea Star, Oceanside, CA

Abreanna Gomes, Environmental Specialist II, Kashia Band of Pomo Indians

Renae Logston, CalCOFI Technician, SIO

Shane, mackerel fisherman

Moderator: Rasmus Swalethorp, SIO

11:30am - 12:00pm - Lunch (meet at Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

**on-site lunch will be provided**

Feel free to take your lunch to benches at Pawka Green, the tables/benches in the grassy area across from the Kaplan Laboratory building, or to the cement benches in front of the Seaside Forum.

12:00pm - 1:00pm - Pier/Pelagic Invertebrate Collection (PIC) Tour (meet at Scripps Seaside Forum - Foyer)

For the tour we will meet in the Foyer of Scripps Seaside Forum @ 12:00pm and then split the group in half & walk to the Pier or the Pelagic Invertebrate Collection (PIC) which is located in Vaughan Hall, Room 125

1:00pm - 3:00pm - Contributed talks: Part I (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Andrew Thompson, SWFSC

Deanna Pinkard-Meier, Tetra Tech
Brian Dresser, Tetra Tech

Offshore wind development is gaining momentum in the United States. Trenching for the first cable for a commercial scale offshore wind farm began in late October 2022, with turbine construction and operations soon to follow. Impacts to fisheries and protected marine species remain some of the largest concerns for development, and one of the limiting factors is the apparent lack of fine scale fisheries and biological data. Multiple federal and state agencies have attempted to gather fisheries data and provide user-friendly interfaces such as mapping portals and summary documents. While these can be useful, feedback from fishers indicates that data sources such as VMS and AIS don’t accurately portray where and when they fish, and feedback from other stakeholders has highlighted that the biological data portrayed is often outdated. Offshore wind on the west coast is in its infancy, but the PACW-1 leases are taking place right now and designing and planning offshore wind farms at Morro Bay and Humboldt will soon follow. How do we best site and design offshore wind farms to allow for continued use for fishers and other ocean users? Is micrositing turbines compatible with floating offshore wind installations? We explore these questions along with the available data and data gaps, and make recommendations for the applications of existing west coast data based on lessons learned from the U.S. east coast and Europe.
John Field, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service Vladlena Gertseva, Fisheries Research, Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Toby Auth,
Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission
E.J. Dick, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Melissa Haltuch, Fisheries Research, Analysis and Monitoring Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Mary Hunsicker, Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Tanya Rogers, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Keith Sakuma, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Jarrod Santora, Fisheries Ecology Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service
Nick Tolimieri, Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has conducted an annual midwater trawl survey for pelagic young-of-the-year (YOY) rockfish in the California Current for the last 40 years to inform recruitment estimates in stock assessments. While the initial survey was limited to central California waters, the survey expanded geographically in the early 2000s due to the failure to detect a very strong 1999-year class. Investigations indicate that survey recruitment indices are more consistent with stock assessment results when informed by the larger survey area, despite the observation that YOY catch rates generally co-vary among California Current regions. However, these investigations indicate that covariation between survey recruitment indices and estimates of year class strength from stock assessments are not always strong. This result exemplifies the challenges faced in informing stock assessments with either, or both, YOY survey indices and environmental indicators of year class strength. Despite these challenges, YOY survey indices may improve near-term estimates of year class strength in rockfish stock assessments, and provide more realistic population projections for management models. We discuss the survey history, emphasizing recent coast-wide pre-recruit data, and our efforts to better quantify and resolve the challenges associated with including YOY survey indices into the stock assessment models that inform management.

Jerome Guiet,  Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
Daniele Bianchi, Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
Kaushik Srinivasan, Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
Carrie C. Wall,Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder

Mid-trophic level (MTL) organisms are abundant in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and play an essential role in the flow of biomass from primary producers to top predators. Yet, their distribution and variability are not fully understood. This lack of understanding emerges from both the complex interaction of MTLs with their environment and the difficulty of sampling these organisms in situ. To close this gap, we use 12 years of acoustic data in the CCE to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of MTLs. Observations at 38 and 120kHz, during day and night, on multiple depth strata (from 15 to 515m), show consistent seasonal and latitudinal shifts in the acoustic backscatter of epipelagic and mesopelagic organisms. In the Southern California Bight, coastal pulses of epipelagic backscatter begin near the coast, spread offshore, and reach a minimum in winter. This succession also occurs for mesopelagic backscatter, although with a multi-month delay. Along the coast, during peak upwelling, epipelagic backscatter shows two regional maxima around 35N and 45N, whereas mesopelagic backscatter remains more uniform with latitude. While acoustic backscatter reflects a combination of community composition, organism abundance and acoustic properties, these large-scale variations shed new light on the regional variability of MTLs and its drivers. We further train a machine learning algorithm with co-located remote sensing data and reanalysis products to fill the gaps in the acoustic observations, providing a broader view of backscatter dynamics in the CCE.

Simone Alin, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory
Samantha Siedlecki, University of Connecticut
Jan Newton, University of Washington
Richard A. Feely, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
Brendan Carter, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of Washington
Jenny Waddell, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Halle Berger, University of Connecticut
Beth Curry, University of Washington
Kathy Hough, Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Since 2006, the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS) has deployed bottom-mounted coastal ocean time-series moorings (15–42 m depth) during the April–October upwelling season to monitor water properties (temperature, salinity, oxygen) and better understand the extent of hypoxic events and other ocean changes. Hypoxia forms on the shelf when decomposition of organic matter from phytoplankton blooms depletes bottom-water oxygen. We used OCNMS time-series to reconstruct the carbonate system using empirical proxy relationships based on high-quality shipboard measurements. We subtracted or extrapolated anthropogenic carbon accumulation in coastal waters to pre-industrial, 2030, and 2040 carbonate chemistry and compared them with projections for the year 2100 from the regional ROMS model, J-SCOPE. Past, present, and future carbonate system and oxygen climatologies indicate that: 1) major along-shelf gradients exist, with intra-seasonal worsening of acidification and hypoxia conditions in the south but not the north; 2) in the present-day, the thermodynamic aragonite saturation threshold is crossed earlier in the season and for longer duration than the hypoxia threshold; and 3) thresholds for aragonite saturation and other carbonate system parameters are crossed earlier in the season, with greater magnitude exceedance and longer duration in present than pre-industrial times. Near-future (2030–2040) projections suggest acidification will accelerate in this region, in a spatially complex manner, exceeding the relative increase in hypoxic conditions. This study is part of a regional vulnerability analysis of northern California Current Ecosystem organisms and Olympic Coast tribal communities on the front lines of climate and ocean change impacts. These results are providing state, tribal, and federal resource and water quality managers information about how exceedance of thresholds for important West Coast species, such as Dungeness crab, has changed between the pre-industrial and present, along with projections of near-future ocean conditions, to facilitate resource management planning and adaptation efforts.

Robert Lampe, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, J. Craig Venter Institute
Ariel Rabines, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, J. Craig Venter Institute
Elizabeth Venrick, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Ralf Goericke, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Anne Schulberg, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, J. Craig Venter Institute
Pratap Venepally, J. Craig Venter Institute
Hong Zheng, J. Craig Venter Institute
Lisa Zeigler, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, J. Craig Venter Institute
Kelly Goodwin, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration
Andrew Allen, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, J. Craig Venter Institute

Coastal upwelling regions such as the California Current Ecosystem are among the most biologically productive regions in the ocean: a phenomenon attributed to the frequent delivery of cold, nutrient-rich water that fuels diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms. Consequently, diatoms drive biogeochemical cycling and support the highly productive fisheries in these upwelling ecosystems. Here we examine pelagic diatom abundances and diversity in the California Current Ecosystem via seven years of CalCOFI surveys. Nearly 1000 DNA samples were used to sequence 18S-V4 and 18S-V9 marker genes with additional samples for gene expression and microscopic cell counts. Seasonality associated with upwelling conditions was found to be a distinct and significant driver of both abundances and diversity. Concurrently, gene expression associated with growth, photosynthesis, and reproduction were also highly correlated with increased abundance and diversity. Overall, the community is dominated by the large chain-forming genera Chaetoceros, Thalassiosira, and Pseudo-nitzschia although some of these dominant taxa are dispersal limited indicating rapid grazing or sinking in the nearshore environment. Differential abundance of specific ASVs highlights groups of diatoms that will potentially be selected for or against under potential future climate scenarios.

 

Stephanie Nehasil, UC San Diego
Emmanis Dorval, Lynker Tech, SWFSC
Carolyn M. Kurle, UC San Diego

Coastal pelagic species (CPS) support important commercial fisheries and are widely consumed by top marine predators in upwelling systems. Thus, they play significant roles in maintaining the livelihood of fishers and in transferring energy from lower to higher trophic levels. However, there is a paucity of basic information on the nutritional quality (i.e., energy density) of these key forage species in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) and the factors affecting inter- and intraspecific variation in forage quality. Here, we aim to demonstrate the variability in nutritional quality for a complex of forage taxa that are ecologically and economically important within the CCE – Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), and market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens). Forage species were collected in Central and Southern California during 2014-2019 from NOAA CPS trawl and juvenile rockfish surveys, CDFW port sampling surveys, and a SWFSC sampling survey at the San Diego bait barge. Whole fish samples were analyzed for energy density (kJ g-1) using bomb calorimetry. Preliminary results suggest differences in forage quality by season, region, and size. Annual changes in quality were also investigated, particularly to determine potential disruptions in energy transfer during the 2014-2016 Marine Heatwave. Our preliminary findings suggest that top predators in the CCE have access to a range of low- to high-energy forage over space and time that most likely depends on CPS life history traits and species-specific energy storage strategies. Identifying trends in the energy density of forage taxa in the CCE may contribute to our understanding of energy requirements of top predators and the mechanisms linking environmental perturbations to predator demographics.

Will Fennie, NOAA SWFSC FRD & UCSC IMS
Noah Ben-Aderet, Ocean Protection Council
Steven Bograd, NOAA, SWFSC, ERD
Garfield Kwan, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Jarrod Santora, SWFSC, FED
Isaac Schroeder, NOAA, SWFSC, ERD, UCSC, IMS,
Andrew Thompson, NOAA, SWFSC, FRD

Identifying factors that affect larval mortality is critical for understanding drivers of fish population dynamics. Although larval fish mortality is incredibly high, small changes in mortality rates can lead to large changes in recruitment. Recent studies suggest maternal provisioning can affect the susceptibility of larvae to starvation and predation. In this study, we measured otolith core width-at-hatch, a proxy for larval size-at-hatch, on 8 species of rockfish (Genus Sebastes) to examine the influence of initial larval size on larval growth and survival, and to understand how oceanographic conditions gestating females experience affect larval size (i.e., quality). Otolith core width-at-hatch was significantly positively related to recent growth rate (5/7 species with sufficient sample size) and survival (all species). This suggests individuals that are larger at hatch generally grow faster and are more likely to survive early life stages. Otolith core width-at-hatch positively relates to increasing percent of Pacific Subarctic Upper Water and is negatively related with Spiciness at the depths parents inhabited during the three months prior to larval collection. In addition, otolith core width-at-hatch was larger further from fishing ports possibly because these locations were historically less fished and contained more, older, larger females and/or had inherently better habitat quality than sites closer to shore. These results indicate that the habitat and environmental conditions female rockfish experience during gestation drives the size of the larvae they produce and impacts early growth and survival of rockfishes.

3:00pm - 3:00pm - Afternoon Coffee/Tea Break (Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

3:30pm - 4:45pm - Contributed talks: Part II (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Trung Nguyen, CDFW

Catherine Nickels National Research Council
Elan J. Portner, UC San Diego, Owyn Snodgrass, NOAA, SWFSC
Barbara Muhling, UC Santa Cruz, NOAA, SWFSC
Heidi Dewar, NOAA, SWFSC

Juvenile Albacore Tuna (Thunnus alalunga) are important predators in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME), where they support both commercial and recreational fisheries. Using a time series of Albacore diets off Northern California, Oregon, and Washington from 2009 to 2021, we investigate environmental drivers of diet variability and evaluate whether dietary differences affect intake of biomass or energy. Prey importance was quantified using three different mean proportional metrics: number, weight, and energy content of prey. Fishes were the most important prey group, and Northern Anchovy (Engraulis mordax) was the most important taxa, by all three metrics. In contrast, the relative importance of Euphausiids (Order: Euphausiidae) shifted from second to third and Pacific Saury (Cololabis saira) shifted from third to second in importance when measured using % weight or % energetic value versus % number. Using classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, Albacore diets characterized by % weight could be distinguished by sea surface temperature and the biologically effective upwelling transport index (BEUTI), both averaged over the first six months of the year of fish collection. Under all environmental conditions, the most important prey was either Northern Anchovy, Euphausiids, or Pacific Saury. The total number, weight, and energy content of prey per Albacore did not significantly differ across our time series, even when corrected for albacore size. Our findings indicate that Albacore diets have changed over time independent of the metric used and that diets have similar energetic values despite differences in prey composition. Further work will quantify the potential prey biomass removals in each mode and investigate the impact of diet on predator condition.

Kamran Walsh, SIO
Rasmus Swalethorp, SIO

Survival through the larval phase greatly affects the population dynamics of most fishes, and a major factor affecting larval growth and survival is the capacity to feed on preferred prey. Here, we examine the feeding ecology of Sebastes spp. larval rockfishes in the Southern California Bight (SCB) with respect to ontogeny, selectivity, and the influence of maternal investment. Rockfishes of the family Sebastidae comprise a highly diverse and abundant family of fishes in the SCB and are both economically and ecologically important. Larval rockfishes were collected from numerous CalCOFI stations throughout the SCB in fall 2020 and winter and spring 2021. Their stomach contents were extracted, identified, and enumerated. Maternal investment was estimated using the nuclear width of extracted otoliths, and growth rates were derived from standard length measurements and daily otolith rings. Larval diets were found to shift between succeeding developmental stages of copepod with changes in ontogeny. Selection towards Calanoid and Cyclopoid nauplii in preflexion larvae shifted to predominantly Calanoid copepodites in the postflexion stage. Positive relationships between otolith core width, length-at-age, and carbon biomass of gut contents suggest that increased growth rates facilitated by maternal investment allow larvae to capitalize more effectively on their preferred prey. These findings provide evidence of selective feeding throughout larval Sebastidae development, and support the notion that maternal investment is an important factor in determining larval growth and survival.

Kelsey James, SWFSC

Emmanis Dorval, SWFSC

Pacific Sardine (Sardinops sagax) are an economically important forage fish in the eastern North Pacific Ocean that are managed under the Coastal Pelagic Species Fishery Management Plan of the Pacific Fishery Management Council. The stock assessments which generally occur annually incorporate fishery-dependent and fishery-independent age data generated by SWFSC, CDFW, and WDFW to inform the annual estimation of abundance. These federal and state agencies have worked closely with laboratories in Canada (DFO) and Mexico (CICIMAR-IPN) on ageing methodology to ensure consistency and maximize accuracy; however, the annuli in otoliths of Pacific Sardine have not been validated. Live Pacific Sardine (mostly age 0) were collected, marked with oxytetracycline (OTC), and raised in captivity at different temperatures (13℃, 15℃, 17℃, & 21℃) for up to one year. Otolith growth was higher for warmer temperatures. All of the individuals that were in captivity for one year (n = 21) deposited 2-3 increments distal to the OTC mark. This result serves to validate the assumption that annuli in otoliths are deposited annually in young Pacific Sardine (1-2 years old). This also supports the ageing methodology used for this species by all ageing laboratories in US, Mexico, and Canada, while providing new information to better develop studies on correlating Pacific Sardine growth to temporal variability in oceanic conditions.

Pierre-Yves Hernvann, UC Santa Cruz, NWFSC, NOAA John Field, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz, SWFSC, NOAA Sharon Melin, AFSC, NOAA Jarrod A. Santora, SWFSC, NOAA Brian K. Wells, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz, SWFSC, NOAA Isaac Kaplan, NWFSC, NOAA Desiree Tommasi, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz, SWFSC, NOAA Barbara Muhling, Institute of Marine Sciences, UC Santa Cruz, SWFSC, NOAA K. Alexandra Curtis, SWFSC, NOAA

California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are emblematic and ecologically important predators that feed on a diversity of forage fish species. In southern California, sea lion diet reflects variations in the availability of some key forage species and changes in the overall species assemblages. However, such studies were limited to correlative analyses, preventing mechanistic quantification of the response of sea lion diet to changes in the availability of their prey. We use a Bayesian multispecies functional response (MFSR) model to link scat data of sea lions from different colonies to the relative abundance of prey in their respective foraging areas. Specifically, the MSFR model is fitted to 1990-2019 time-series of frequencies of occurrences of sardine (Sardinops sagax), anchovy (Engraulis mordax), market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens), Pacific hake (Merluccius productus) and rockfish species (Sebastes spp) in scats and regional abundance indices from an ecosystem assessment survey to estimate shape parameters of the Holling’s functional responses. These parameters notably characterize the feeding preference of sea lions for these major prey items. Our results notably highlight a high predilection of sea lions for high-energy content prey like anchovy, contrasting with a low affinity for species like squid, whose large consumption would be mainly driven by particularly high abundance in the foraging areas. Using the model in a predictive mode may allow us to estimate (i) the consumption of a given prey by sea lions when knowing its abundance and that of alternative prey and (ii) and the availability of a forage species in a given area when scat analyses are available. Thus, our approach has potential to strengthen the stock assessment of forage species in the California Current by providing more accurate natural mortality estimates, or extending abundance or recruitment time-series back in time when surveys were not available.      
K. Alexandra Curtis, SWFSC, NOAA
Emmanis Dorval, Lynker Tech, SWFSC, NOAA
Maya Philipp, UC San Diego

Market squid (Doryteuthis opalescens) is a key coastal pelagic species of the California Current Ecosystem and supports one of California’s most valuable fisheries. Yet, critical aspects of its dynamics and status remain unknown due to lack of adequate sampling coverage in space and time. Market squid are short-lived, with large population fluctuations and migrations that have been linked to seasonal and interannual temperature variation. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are important predators of market squid, which are more common in sea lion diet in the Southern California Bight (SCB) than any other prey species. California sea lions primarily consume large juvenile to adult size classes of market squid, with consumption shown to correlate to landings and to vary with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index. We correlated quarterly indices of market squid consumption from the southern Channel Islands from 1999 to 2015 with spawning stock biomass (SSB) estimates of market squid for two management areas that overlap with known foraging ranges for these islands. We found strong correlation between market squid SSB and sea lion diet indices for the SCB as a whole, as well as evidence of resolution of subregional differences in SSB in diet indices from different islands, with promising results for refining parameters upon which egg escapement (an MSY proxy) is derived for this species. We also found strong temporal autocorrelation in quarterly squid consumption indices, with potential for better characterizing the spawner-recruit relationship, predicting market squid SSB three to six months in advance, and harnessing the power of a 40+-year quarterly time series of sea lion diet in the SCB to illuminate market squid population dynamics and environmental drivers. Sea lions prove to be effective samplers of market squid, with potential applications to monitoring this key species, better understanding its population dynamics, and improving stock assessment.

4:45pm - 5:00pm - Closing remarks (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Ed Weber, Research Fish Biologist, SWFSC

5:15pm - 8:30pm - Welcome reception (Martin Johnson House)

**light dinner & refreshments will be provided**

We strongly recommend that you wear warm attire as the evening reception will be outdoors, so will be cold and possibly windy

December 5th, 2026

CalCOFI Symposium – Innovative techniques and novel applications of time series data to marine resource management

Sam McClatchie, FishOcean Enterprises Ltd

Brice Semmens, SIO

Moderator: Brice Semmens, SIO

9:00am - 10:00am - Keynotes: Innovations in Fisheries Management (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Brice Semmens, SIO

Dr. Eric Ward, Statistician, NWFSC

Eric Ward is a statistician for NOAA at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle and an affiliate professor at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS) at the University of Washington. He works on a wide range of projects, ranging from stock assessment problems to protected species issues. Much of his recent work has involved time series analyses, spatial analysis, and forecasting techniques.

Katie Grady, Environmental ScientistCDFW            Julia Coastes, Senior Environmental Scientist, CDFW

Katie Grady is an environmental scientist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). She works primarily in management of the California market squid fishery and monitoring data. She also supports ageing of Northern anchovy, mapping of coastal pelagic finfish survey data, and various subtidal kelp and invertebrate surveys. Prior to joining CDFW in 2018, she worked with the Channel Islands National Park Kelp Forest Monitoring program where she conducted subtidal monitoring on scuba at various sites and analyzed time series data. She received her master’s degree from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, where she did applied research studying invertebrate ecophysiology and population dynamics. Katie is a NAUI Scuba Instructor and has a life-long goal of encountering a giant squid.

Julia Coates is a senior environmental scientist, specialist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). She provides quantitative support to all programs within the Marine Region where she is needed, thus working on invertebrates and finfish as well as commercial and recreational fisheries. Among other analyses, Julia works on stock assessments, population dynamics models, harvest control rule development, and management strategy evaluations. Julia serves as the primary CDFW representative on the CalCOFI Committee and is on the CDFW dive team. Prior to joining CDFW in 2014, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Ocean Science Trust and Southern California Coastal Water Research Project and completed a PhD in ecology in the joint program between UC Davis and San Diego State University.

10:00am - 10:30am - Morning Coffee/Tea Break (Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

10:00am - 10:30am - Keynotes: Innovations in Water Quality & Ocean Observing (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Zachary Gold, PMEL

Dr. Susanna Theroux, Ecologist, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project (SCCWRP) 

Susanna Theroux is an ecologist specializing in microbiology and biogeochemistry. Her research focuses on the development of molecular methods (next-generation DNA and RNA sequencing) for bioassessment and biomonitoring, with an emphasis on microbial community response to environmental change. Dr. Theroux received her PhD in Geological Sciences from Brown University and completed a postdoc in Computational Biology at the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute. She joined the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project in 2016 and currently leads the California Water Quality Monitoring Council’s Molecular Methods Workgroup.

 

Dr. Clarissa Anderson, Executive Director,Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS)

Clarissa Anderson is a biological oceanographer with expertise in ecological forecasting and remote sensing. Her research focuses on the prediction of harmful algal blooms and toxins in estuarine and coastal ecosystems as well as the fate and transport of harmful toxins to deeper waters and sediments. During her time as research faculty at UC Santa Cruz, she worked to establish the California Harmful Algae Risk Mapping (C-HARM) system with NASA Applied Science support. Clarissa is now at Scripps Institution of Oceanography serving as the Executive Director of the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS) and continuing to conduct research on phytoplankton ecology in coastal California. She is an elected member of the UNESCO SCOR GlobalHAB Scientific Steering Committee, the UN SCOR Working Group on Observing Air-Sea Interaction Strategy, the Science Advisory Team for the CA Ocean Protection Council (OPC), the U.S. National HAB Committee (NHC), and the Steering Committee for the Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring and Alert Program (Cal-HABMAP).

 

11:30am - 12:00pm - Lunch (meet at Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

**on-site lunch will be provided**

Feel free to take your lunch to benches at Pawka Green, the tables/benches in the grassy area across from the Kaplan Laboratory building, or to the cement benches in front of the Seaside Forum.

For the tour we will meet in the Foyer of Scripps Seaside Forum @ 12:00pm and then split the group in half & walk to the Pier or the Pelagic Invertebrate Collection (PIC) which is located in Vaughan Hall, Room 125

1:00pm - 2:45pm - Contributed talks: Part III (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Andrew Thompson, SWFSC

Zachary Gold, CalCOFI, SCCWRP 
Brice Semmens, CalCOFI, SIO, UC San Dirgo
Noelle Bowlin, CalCOFI, SWFSC, NOAA
Susie Theroux, SCCWRP
Clarissa Anderson, SCCOOS, SIO, UC San Diego
Mark Ohman, CCE-LTER, SIO, UC San Diego
Stephanie Matthews, CCE-LTER, SIO, UC San Diego
Jeff Bowman, Scripps Ecological Observatory, SIO, UC San Diego
Katherine Barbeau, CCE-LTER, SIO, UC San Diego
Moira Decima, CCE-LTER, SIO, UC San Diego
Andrew Allen, CalCOFI NCOG, SIO, UC San Diego
Robert Lampe, CalCOFI NCOG, SIO, UC San Diego
Kelly Goodwin, NOAA, OAR
Nastasia Patin, NOAA, OAR
Bob Miller, SBC-MBON
Gabrielle Canonico, NOAA-MBON

The Southern California Ocean Biomolecular Observing Network’s (SoCal-OBON) is a cooperative of multiple southern California ocean observing programs and regional ocean stakeholders collectively promoting the integration and harmonization of molecular approaches in the Southern California regional biomonitoring efforts. The network’s primary objective is to provide an unprecedented resolution of key ecological indicators across space, time, and trophic levels relevant to marine management. To achieve this, the Network will integrate the suite of existing ocean observing platforms bridging nearshore and offshore biomonitoring efforts and apply standardized molecular approaches to best characterize biological communities and their response to environmental change across the Southern California Bight. This leveraged effort will combine physical and chemical measurements, advanced ocean imaging technologies, and molecular biomonitoring approaches to provide the ecological resolution needed to 1) understand the interplay of water quality and climate driven ocean acidification/hypoxia impacts on biological communities, 2) allow for the identification and forecasting of HABs, 3) better inform fisheries management through the identification of trophic and oceanographic drivers of assemblage dynamics, and 4) map spatio-temporal distributions of protected species. Key to the success of harmonizing ocean monitoring across ocean observing platforms is the standardization of molecular sampling efforts. To achieve these objectives this workshops will convene representatives from each Network partner; local, state, and federal management agencies; industry representatives; and academics to 1) identify operational, technical, and methodological gaps among current monitoring efforts, 2) identify key management questions and relevant biodiversity targets, 3) coordinate the design and validation of molecular assays for priority biological and chemical targets, and 4) plan and coordinate leveraged studies to compare current sampling practices and identify key areas of disagreement across platform-specific sampling methods. We hope that SoCal-OBON will serve to provide guidance on best practices and effectively integrate molecular observations off the coast of California and beyond within the context of the international process, the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021- 2030).
Mark Ohman, SIO
Sven Gastauer, SIO, Thünen Institute of Sea Fisheries, Bremerhaven
Jeffrey S. Ellen, NIWC, San Diego

Zooglider is a fully autonomous buoyancy driven glider developed at SIO by the Instrument Development Group that now incorporates 3 instruments relevant to sensing zooplankton and the organisms with which they interact: Zoocam, a shadowgraph imaging system with telecentric lens; Zonar, a dual-frequency (1000 kHz and 200 kHz) active echosounder; and Acousonde, a broadband hydrophone. These instruments are in addition to standard sensors on Spray gliders. Zooglider dives from 0-400 m and can image zooplankton and marine snow every 5 cm on ascent, resolving fine scale micro-layers that are of particular significance to predator-prey interactions (sensu Lasker). The Zoocam has also revealed vertically offset layers of marine snow and living phytoplankton, with particle-grazing zooplankton showing a greater tendency to associate with marine snow. The plethora of optical images generated by Zoocam has led to our active research toward optimizing Deep Learning Models for image classification, resulting in a Convolutional Neural Network model that achieves 95% accuracy with a 58-category classification problem. An innovation introduced with Zonar is the use of concurrent Zoocam images to parameterize an acoustic scattering model (Distorted Wave Born Approximation, DWBA) for the specific shapes and sizes of the primary zooplankton taxa found in our region. The resulting DWBA models enable us to categorize sources of acoustic backscatter into at least 3 size classes and to distinguish body size-dependent differences in amplitude and timing of Diel Vertical Migration behavior and in responses to ocean frontal features. Our Acousonde records vocalizations from marine mammals, fishes, and invertebrates and has revealed strong diel periodicity in some (but not all) of the potential predator field for the zooplankton. We will summarize some of the advantages of autonomous Zooglider measurements and their potential relationship to marine resource management.
Mark Morales, UC Santa Cruz

Understanding mechanisms driving year-to-year changes in the survival of the early life stages (ELS) of marine fishes has challenged fisheries oceanographers for over a century. One promising approach, however, is to relate changes in somatic growth of ELS to early life survival, and eventual recruitment. Here I use output from a high resolution ROMS-NEMURO simulation of the central California Current System (cCCS) to model growth potential of ELS Shortbelly Rockfish (Sebastes jordani), a highly abundant and ecologically important marine fish species. Temperature fields and zooplankton abundance are used as input to a bioenergetics model with four ontogenetic stages: (i) preflexion, (ii) flexion, (iii) postflexion, and (iv) pelagic juveniles. The model was calibrated and corroborated first through a 0-D climatological simulation. A 2-D spatial climatological simulation (1988-2010) was then used to understand spatial patterns of growth potential across the four life stages. Highest growth potential for preflexion larvae was spatially constrained and overlapped with empirical reproduction maps while the highest growth potential for pelagic juveniles overlapped with regions of elevated juvenile catch rates. Next, I used a spatiotemporal simulation (1988-2010) to relate growth potential to a recruitment index derived from a fisheries-independent survey. Functional response curves show that growth potential of each of the four ontogenetic life stages differentially effects recruitment, but overall explains >80% of recruitment variability. These results highlight that shortbelly rockfish, on average, reproduce in areas that promote rapid early growth and survival. Furthermore, the relative importance of growth potential to explain recruitment is life stage specific, with growth during the flexion and pelagic juvenile stages contributing the greatest to recruitment. To conclude, I will discuss how these results fit into the broader scope of ecosystem oceanography as shortbelly are one of the most important forage species to higher trophic level predators in the cCCS.

Jacob Snyder, The Pennsylvania State University, NOAA
James Ruzicka, PIFSC, NOAA

End-to-end ecosystem models consider trophic relationships, environmental conditions, and the migration and physical transport of living groups between sub-regions to estimate how ecosystem structure responds to changing environmental conditions and anthropogenic pressures. ECOTRAN, a dynamic ecosystem model, was used to model the central North Pacific Ocean, which supports Hawai’i’s economically important longline fishing industry. Incorporation of the ecophysiologies of model organisms is a necessary improvement to effectively capture ecosystem-level responses to changing environmental conditions. Accurate knowledge gained from well-constructed ecosystem models can inform United States fisheries management efforts. Diel vertical migration is a major structuring process of oceanic ecosystems and exposes migrating species to a widely changing temperature environment. Species’ physiological responses to temperature were implemented in the ECOTRAN model as Q10 scalers of metabolic costs and parameterized from literature reviews. Environmental conditions were parameterized using temperature data collected during a NOAA PIFSC research cruise sampling the remote North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Model simulations were run under alternate Q10 values and increasing temperature regimes to predict the effects of environmental change on the production rates of individual living groups and changes to community composition, as well as to estimate uncertainty in ecosystem response related to Q10 parameterization. The Central North Pacific ECOTRAN model was used to test the hypothesis that environmental change will have a larger impact on higher trophic level predators via indirect eco-physiological effects on their prey and restructuring of the food web, rather than directly on the predators themselves.

Michaela Alksne, SIO
Gabrielle Arrieta, SIO
Ana Sofia Aniceto, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Ana Širović, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Simone Baumann-Pickering, SIO

Passive acoustic recordings of marine mammals have been collected onboard CalCOFI cruises since 2004. Baleen whales, including blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), produce stereotyped low frequency calls associated with social activity, mating, and foraging. Sonobuoys deployed at CalCOFI sampling stations collect acoustic data containing numerous recordings of these distinct calls; namely blue whale B and D calls, and fin whale 20 Hz and 40 Hz calls. Additionally, the NOAA CalCOFI Genomics Project (NCOG) has collected eDNA samples since 2014. CalCOFI’s standardized sampling protocol arranges measurements to be collected simultaneously, allowing for direct comparisons of eDNA and acoustics as methods to detect marine mammals. However, both sampling methods generate large volumes of data and developing automated processing pipelines is necessary if we are to efficiently quantify the underlying ecological patterns. Here, we aim to train convolutional neural networks to detect and classify whale calls in spectrogram images derived from CalCOFI sonobuoy recordings. Convolutional neural networks are data-driven image classifiers that have previously been applied to classify highly variable baleen whale call types in spectrograms. By applying this novel approach to the CalCOFI dataset, we will be able to process large volumes of acoustic data in a relatively short time frame, reduce analyst-bias, and generate call-specific time series to investigate the seasonal presence of baleen whales within the CalCOFI sampling grid. Furthermore, we will compare baleen whale acoustic presence with their genetic presence in eDNA samples, allowing us to assess the variance in animal detection across survey methods. The novel integration of bioacoustics, machine learning, and eDNA, is uniquely suited to the CalCOFI dataset and will be used to improve our understanding of baleen whale biogeography in the Southern California Bight.

2:45pm - 3:15pmpm - Afternoon Coffee/Tea Break (Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

3:15pm - 4:30pm - Contributed talks: Part IV (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Moderator: Rasmus Swalethorp, SIO

Ryan Freedman, National Marine Sanctuaries – Channel Islands, NOAA
Amy Hays, SWFSC, NOAA
Zack Gold, Southern California Coastal Water Project, SIO, SWFSC, NOAA
Chris Caldow, National Marine Sanctuaries – Channel Islands, NOAA
Rachel Pound, SIO
Nico Concha-Saiz, SWFSC, NOAA
Dylan Inskeep, CDFW Marine Region
Harrison Huang,CDFW Marine Region
Gary Nunn, Illumina
Tamara Russell, SIO
Robert Lampe, SIO, JCVI
Anne Schulberg, SIO, JCVI
John Crofts, SWFSC, NOAA
Brice Semmens, SIO
Noelle Bowlin, SWFSC, NOAA

CalCOFI’s long history of contemporaneous biological, physical, and chemical time series data makes it an invaluable asset for resource management and ecosystem research. Recent marine zoning management efforts for protected areas and proposed wind energy areas have increased the need for these types of data collected by CalCOFI at different spatial scales and for new technologies to effectively monitor marine ecosystems. In an attempt to meet the resource management needs of state and federal governments, NOAA and Scripps Oceanography researchers conducted an expanded CalCOFI mission to 16 locations identified as important by federal agencies. During this “Enhanced CalCOFI Cruise”, physical data and ichthyoplankton and water chemistry samples were collected at each location as well as eDNA samples using five different protocols to compare methodologies. Additionally, seabird and marine mammal observations were conducted while transiting between desired locations. This expanded sampling will help with the designation of the new Chumash Heritage National Marine Sanctuary and track potential impacts from offshore Wind Energy Development.
Marina Frants, SIO
Ben Best, EcoQuants
Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI
Brice Semmens, SIO
Rasmus Swalethorp, SIO
Ralf Goericke, SIO
Andrew Thompson, NOAA
Ed Weber, NOAA

A centralized Postgres SQL database is being developed to host all CalCOFI datasets collected since the start of the project, as well as all future data. The Postgres server runs inside a Docker container hosted on a virtual machine instance in Google Cloud. Hosting all the data in a single database helps ensure consistency in naming conventions, date formats, measurement units and taxonomic classification. It also allows for easy searching and cross-referencing of data among multiple data sets. Species data is linked to the Integrated Taxonomic Identification System (ITIS), and the full taxonomic information for every species is stored using the Postgres ltree extension, which allows for efficient hierarchical searches. The database will serve as a backend for the Shiny R package visualization tools and API that are being developed in parallel. Automated tools for archiving future data and for publishing to outside repositories will also be provided.
Benjamin Best, EcoQuants
Erin Sattherwaite, CalCOFI
Jennifer Brown, NOAA
Marina Frants, CalCOFI

The usability of CalCOFI data for answering research questions and management needs has been expanded through a set of new data tools found at CalCOFI.io. An interactive application built using the Shiny framework in R allows for selection and visualization of the data in space and time. For oceanographic variables, contour maps are complemented by plots of time series, depth profiles and transects. Fish larvae, marine mammals and seabirds can also be visualized with maps and over time. The visualizations are rendered based on arguments to a set of documented functions packaged into an R library, which also has a set of data fetching functions for easily extracting parameterized data from the application programming interface (API). The API allows for extraction from regularly used reporting areas, such as National Marine Sanctuaries or other marine protected areas, as well as arbitrarily input new polygons. The full suite of tools is meant to appeal across a wide audience, from the Shiny app for a general user to the API for a scientific programmer, all using open-source cross-platform software for enabling reproducible reporting for management of our pelagic marine resources in the California Current.
Jennifer Brown, Channel Island National Marine Sanctuary
Chris Caldow, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary
Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI, SIO
Brice Semmens, CalCOFI, SIO
Marina Frants, CalCOFI, SIO
Ben Best, EcoQuants
 Mallika Gupta, CalCOFI, California Sea Grant, SIO
Annie Adams, CalCOFI, California Sea Grant, SIO
Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI, California Sea Grant, SIO
Trevor Ruiz, Department of Statistics and Applied Probability, UC Santa Barbara

Analysis of CalCOFI’s extensive dissolved oxygen data have indicated that oxygen levels are declining in the ocean off the coast of California, threatening the marine ecosystems that Californians rely on for food, energy, medicine, wellbeing, and more. It is important to inform California’s coastal communities about deoxygenation in order to raise public understanding and awareness of this issue. However, communicating hypoxia to people outside of marine sciences can be tricky without also providing the appropriate context and domain knowledge. The goal of our primer on hypoxia is to educate Californians about ocean deoxygenation and the importance of long-term ocean observations (e.g., the CalCOFI program) in an engaging way. The primer utilizes “scrollytelling”, to break down large amounts of information into smaller and more digestible components in a scrolled-based interactive webpage. This format integrates graphics alongside each component page, facilitating the use of diagrams to enhance the audience’s understanding. Such a data story can simultaneously help to contextualize an important environmental issue, demonstrate the value of previous research, and encapsulate the necessity of future calls to action. While this scrollytelling product can be hosted on a public website to maximize accessibility, similar products with different goals and audiences can employ a variety of distribution methods. Educational tools of this kind have tremendous potential within marine resource management, where initiatives can involve stakeholders from varying backgrounds.

4:30pm - 5:00pm - Closing remarks (Scripps Seaside Forum - Auditorium)

Noelle Bowlin, SWFSC, NOAA

5:15pm - 8:30pm - Poster/Interactive Session & Pizza Party (Martin Johnson House)

**posters will be showcased in 2 sessions from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm and light dinner & refreshments provided**

6:00pm - 7:00pm - Session 1
7:00pm - 8:00pm - Session 2

We strongly recommend that you wear warm attire as the evening reception will be outdoors, so will be cold and possibly windy

December 6th, 2022

Workshops

8:00am - 12:00pm - Concurrent Workshops (Scripps Seaside Forum - Conference rooms)

Location:
Busselli/Loeb Room 160

Session Lead:
Zachary GoldCalCOFI

Session Co-leads:
Susanna Theroux, Southern California Coastal Watershed Research Project
Andrew Thompson, SWFSC, NOAA

Overview:
The Southern California Ocean Biomolecular Observing Network’s (SoCal-OBON) objective is to provide an unprecedented resolution of key ecological indicators across space, time, and biodiversity relevant to marine management. To achieve this, the Network will integrate the suite of existing ocean observing platforms bridging nearshore and offshore biomonitoring efforts and apply standardized molecular approaches to best characterize biological communities and their response to environmental change across the Southern California Bight. This leveraged effort will combine physical and chemical measurements, advanced ocean imaging technologies, and molecular biomonitoring approaches to provide the ecological resolution needed to 1) understand the interplay of water quality and climate driven ocean acidification/hypoxia impacts on biological communities, 2) allow for the identification and forecasting of HABs, 3) better inform fisheries management through the identification of trophic and oceanographic drivers of assemblage dynamics, and 4) map spatio-temporal distributions of protected species. This is the third of a series of scoping meetings to identify priority objectives that will leverage regularly occurring conferences that have strong stakeholder buy-in and attendance. This workshop builds off of the 2nd National Marine eDNA Workshop and Bight ‘23 workshops to bring together key SoCal-OBON stakeholders to address the operational and scientific challenges of multi-platform interoperability.

Goals: Key to the success of harmonizing ocean monitoring across ocean observing platforms is the standardization of molecular sampling efforts. To achieve these objectives this workshops will convene representatives from each Network partner; local, state, and federal management agencies; industry representatives; and academics to 1) identify operational, methodological gaps between current monitoring efforts, 2) identify key management questions of concern and priority biodiversity targets to address them, 3) coordinate the design and validation of molecular assays for priority targets, and 4) plan and coordinate leveraged studies to compare current sampling practices and identify key sources of platform specific sampling methodology disagreement. Ultimately, the direct comparisons of molecular methodologies spawned from this meeting will provide the baseline intercalibration data needed to identify current operational gaps between observing platforms and help inform best practices needed for successful integration of molecular biomonitoring efforts. The results and outcomes of our integration efforts will directly inform the national NOAA Strategic Molecular Strategy and CA Ocean Protection Council Ocean Monitoring Plan, serving as a template for strategic integration of molecular ocean observing worldwide. Preliminary results from intercalibration exercises will allow for the integration of data streams, providing unprecedented resolution of marine biodiversity across the Southern California Bight. These results will provide critical insights into the offshore and nearshore linkages in this system and serve as a springboard for the development and advancement of molecular ocean observations to address pressing ocean challenges like ocean acidification and hypoxia impacts, prediction and forecasting of HABs, higher resolution fisheries assessments, and high resolution mapping of protected species.
Location:
Charles Scripps Room 150

Session Lead:
Matthew SavocaStanford University

Session Co-lead:
Matthew Savoca,
Stanford
Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI
Karen McLaughlin, SCCWRP
Amalia Almada, USC Sea Grant

Overview: The environment is contaminated by hundreds of thousands of legacy, emerging, and novel synthetic compounds that are persistent in the environment on scales of decades to centuries. Long-term datasets are essential to uncover patterns over time as synthetic chemicals are introduced, regulated, and phased out of production. At the same time there are numerous compounds of unknown origin, use, effects, and fates that have permeated marine systems. Long term monitoring datasets, such as CalCOFI, SCCWRP Bight Monitoring Program, and SWAMP, provide unparalleled temporal resolution of planktonic organisms in the Southern California Bight to delve into questions related to the chronology of contaminants in this ecosystem. The purpose of this roundtable is to explore current efforts to understand pollutant monitoring in CA (e.g., DDT+, PFAS, microplastics), understand what samples exist for contaminant analyses, understand opportunities for longer term/consistent sample collection, and how to develop a collaborative, statewide sampling paradigm moving forward that leverages existing pollutant monitoring efforts and incorporates pollutants into existing time series programs. We will also allot time to discuss possible mechanisms to fund this work, exploring the potential for a future proposal.

Goals: Explore the legislative drivers for pollutant monitoring related to the case studies below in CA Review what pollutant studies and more long-term efforts have been conducted from existing pollutant monitoring/observing systems in CA Discuss what capabilities exist within our networks & existing programs to provide and process samples for which pollutants Consider pollutant studies that could be conducted using archived CalCOFI samples Propose sample collection framework for future CalCOFI cruises to use for pollutant studies Brainstorm ways to fund this work which includes analysis as well as coordination of living database/platform of available samples and/or interested community of practice
Location:
Edward W. ‘Ted’ Scripps II Room 165

Session Lead:
Brice Semmens, CalCOFI, SIO

Session Co-lead:
Eric Ward, NWFSC, NMFS, NOAA

Overview:
Understanding the environmental drivers of fish recruitment has been a major area of research for more than a century. In an era of non-stationary ocean conditions, quantifying these relationships is essential for robust management of fish populations. At the same time, new modes of observation, combined with robust long-term monitoring programs, continue to generate increasingly complex fisheries and ecosystem data streams. Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated that fish recruitment can be forecasted over short periods of time using covariates related to larval densities, data from similar species, and/or raw or derived environmental time-series. A variety of emerging computational methods have also been used to improve forecasts and assess their skill, including linear, non-linear and non-parametric approaches. While the forecasting skill of these methods can be surprisingly high, the path towards using these forecasts within traditional fisheries stock assessments remains unclear. Challenges include dealing with large numbers of possible environmental drivers, non-stationary relationships, complex estimation models that already integrate many data sources, incorporating non-parametric methods into stock assessment’s likelihood-based framework, and the sometimes weak relationships between single drivers and recruitment. This workshop aims to bring together experts in forecasting and fisheries/resource assessment to discuss gains in recruitment forecasting methods, and approaches for integrating such forecasts into common fisheries assessment methods and associated management tools.

Goals:
Discuss emerging recruitment prediction tools, and brainstorm methods for incorporating prediction into fisheries management workflows, including but not limited assessment methods.

10:00am - 10:30am - Morning Coffee/Tea Break (Scripps Seaside Forum - Patio)

12:00pm - Conference ends

To Register

1) Fill out this brief registration form (~5 minutes to complete) to indicate your interest in the CalCOFI conference this year and to share input by Nov. 1st

2) Pay the registration fees for the conference through EventBrite by Nov. 1st

3) Optional-- Submit your talks through the abstract submission form by Nov. 1st

Please share widely with your collaborators and networks and we look forward to seeing you in December!

Registration fees*
- In-person regular rate: $285.00
- In-person student/postdoc/early career (<2 years from graduation) or extenuating circumstances rate: $175.00
- Remote regular rate: $165.00
- Remote student/postdoc/early career (<2 years from graduation) or extenuating circumstances rate: $55.00

*Refund upon request only. No later than 11/23/2022. Thank you!

Note about registration costs: Registration fees support with costs associated with the venue rental, catering, registration/event management, and other conference supplies.

HOTELS

If you would like to book a hotel room we have blocked off rooms at the La Jolla Shores Hotel and the Inn by the Sea La Jolla. The room blocks are available until November 4, 2022.

To book at the La Jolla Shores Hotel:
Call La Jolla Shores Hotel at (866) 976-6659 and refer to the CalCOFI Conference when making reservations by Friday, November 4th 2022. The cost is $209 per night for a Garden Patio room type [plus Current occupancy tax 12.725% Daily Amenity Fee $20]. 15 rooms will be held but after the 15 rooms have been claimed, the hotel will begin to offer the Best Available Rate and the bookable rooms will be subject to availability.

To book at the Inn by the Sea La Jolla:
Call Inn by the Sea La Jolla (800) 526-4545 and refer to the CalCOFI Conference - 2022 when making reservations by Friday, November 4th 2022. The cost is $171 per night for [plus Current occupancy tax 12.725%].

For conference inquiries, please email Erin Satterthwaite, CalCOFI Coordinator